Juki TL2010Q – Part 1

When I started sewing about eight years ago, I never dreamed that I would be where I am today in my skill level.  I can still remember that misshapen chicken pincushion. Or thought I would be able to make a bag where the handles were even, and the same length.

As I began making bigger quilts and wanting to do more intricate quilting designs, I started to dream of a sewing machine with a bigger throat and maybe a higher arm that I could push the quilt through.  I love my JANOME, I really do.  It has even stitches, some nice bells and whistles, and it has never given me a lick of trouble.  But trying to push a quilt lap quilt through that 6″ throat was starting to make me ache for days afterwards.  I’ve been so impressed with the Janome brand that they were the company I went with when I got my little travel machine.  So of course I had my eyes on the HORIZON, with the stitch regulator and 9″ throat.  *sigh*   But it wasn’t in my price range – well perhaps it would be if I stopped buying fabric and yarn – so I did make my decision there.

A few people began talking about straight stitch machines.  Some people had little feather weights that they used on retreats.  Straight stitch is the majority of what I do, so I started wondering about them. A gal I know then came to a retreat with the JUKI TL 2010Q.  We talked about it for a while, she let me try it and I began to think that this might be a good machine to start thinking about.  I began doing some heavy research on machines, when the Juki name kept appearing.  Trying to find a great domestic machine that could produce lovely free motion quilting was a key piece for me. There seemed to be quite a few folks who were using this JUKI and loving it for piecing and for free motion quilting.  After all, Juki says that this TL 2010Q is for quilters.  It has an enormous throat and the space between the table and the arm is HUGE.  And it was in a price range I could manage.

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After more research and chatting about it with dear old Nate, we decided to give it a whirl.  The only thing it didn’t have was the stitch regulator, but after talking with so many people about what it was capable of, that ended up not being a deal breaker for me. Now in my city there is NO Juki dealer, so I knew I was taking a risk by ordering it over the phone or online and having it shipped.   I found it on Amazon for a very reasonable price,  and I took the plunge and ordered it.  It came in record time.

The excitement was unbearable.  After un-boxing it I took time to read through the manual.  After all, I am going from a computerized machine to a manual machine.  The learning curve, I thought, was going to be steep.  Once it had been set up and threaded I was set to go and began working on it.  The speed and power was SCARY in fact.

Everything was going fine and dandy too.  But then I came into some problems and things went from everything coming up roses to some sleepless nights – no I’m not joking.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Juki TL2010Q – Part 1

  1. Pat

    That Juki machine is the identical twin to the Brother 1500 PQ – a straight stictin’ beast that I love for piecing and FMQ. I’ve even been able to use Juki “feet” on it as I have the fmq foot. It’s a great with the bigger harp space. I’m curious to hear what you mention at the end about problems arising – can’t imagine what, but guess we’ll wait to see part 2!?

  2. Oh no Jen! Wondering what happened, and if it’s been resolved. Juki has been on my mind for a future purchase for the exact same reasons you list.

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